Anthropomorphology

Ask me anything   Submit   Dustin.
23.Male, Northern Ontario, Canada. INTJ. enneagram highest first
(5, 1, 9, 8, 3, 4, 7, 6, 2)
Ravenclaw, Left wing liberal. I aspire to get a phd in engineering one day. I have worked really hard to get to where I am today. Things have been getting really great in my life, and I enjoy it. I love reading all types of textbooks, philosophy and art. My queue posts every hour between 12pm -12am

hadrian6:

Evening - The Fall of Day. 1869-70. William Rimmer. American 1816-1879. crayon, oil and graphite on canvas.

hadrian6:

Evening - The Fall of Day. 1869-70. William Rimmer. American 1816-1879. crayon, oil and graphite on canvas.

(via oldmanhamm)

— 23 hours ago with 377 notes
gamko:

Oh, no, of course, you’re right. My mistake.

gamko:

Oh, no, of course, you’re right. My mistake.

(via ruinedchildhood)

— 23 hours ago with 45680 notes

firelorcl:

when you’re a racist, sexist, homophobic straight white boy and everyone calls you out on it

image

(via bryceckrispies)

— 23 hours ago with 17872 notes

ptolemy2:

cyclopentadiene:

ptolemy2:

What I don’t understand is if you keep breaking down rocks so that they’re at an atomic state with no bond connections…then why doesn’t it act like a liquid? I mean, sand is somewhat fluid like…but if we broke down sand infinitesimally, wouldn’t it just be exactly like a liquid? 

Same idea with ice because it’s so much clearer, but if we broke down ice physically, breaking all the hydrogen bonds….Then those bonds don’t form complex patterns, and therefore should act like water?????

Congrats, you’ve described the solid-to-liquid phase transition. :D

Sand (silicon dioxide) is held together by kinda-covalent-kinda-ionic bonds between silicon and oxygen. Physically breaking down sand requires that you break those bonds to separate the pieces. But remember that breaking bonds is an endothermic process and requires energy. At some point while you break down those bonds, you’ll have to input so much energy that you melt it—making it exactly like a liquid, because it is a liquid now.

Whoa. My favourite. So is there actually a point where you can break those bonds physically at low temperature?

Does this mean when ever I break some thing the physical force actually causes the solid to melt at the fracture line? Causing it to break?

If I pinch sand hard enough. Will it turn into a rock?

This was an amazing answer, although I’m splitting rocks, not crushing them. If I use enough physical strength to split a rock, sure the energy will go into the rock, although it wouldn’t have anything else to melt too.

The grinding of a rock was just an analogy of splitting.

— 1 day ago with 11 notes
amnhnyc:

On land, sunlight illuminates a world that’s bright and bursting with color. But in the ocean, light and color diminish as the water gets deeper. Take a look at what happens to light as it moves through the water, and how marine organisms have adapted.
Learn more in our traveling exhibition, Creatures of Light.  

amnhnyc:

On land, sunlight illuminates a world that’s bright and bursting with color. But in the ocean, light and color diminish as the water gets deeper. Take a look at what happens to light as it moves through the water, and how marine organisms have adapted.

Learn more in our traveling exhibition, Creatures of Light.  

(via brainsx)

— 1 day ago with 956 notes

cyclopentadiene:

ptolemy2:

What I don’t understand is if you keep breaking down rocks so that they’re at an atomic state with no bond connections…then why doesn’t it act like a liquid? I mean, sand is somewhat fluid like…but if we broke down sand infinitesimally, wouldn’t it just be exactly like a liquid? 

Same idea with ice because it’s so much clearer, but if we broke down ice physically, breaking all the hydrogen bonds….Then those bonds don’t form complex patterns, and therefore should act like water?????

Congrats, you’ve described the solid-to-liquid phase transition. :D

Sand (silicon dioxide) is held together by kinda-covalent-kinda-ionic bonds between silicon and oxygen. Physically breaking down sand requires that you break those bonds to separate the pieces. But remember that breaking bonds is an endothermic process and requires energy. At some point while you break down those bonds, you’ll have to input so much energy that you melt it—making it exactly like a liquid, because it is a liquid now.

Whoa. My favourite. So is there actually a point where you can break those bonds physically at low temperature?

Does this mean when ever I break some thing the physical force actually causes the solid to melt at the fracture line? Causing it to break?

If I pinch sand hard enough. Will it turn into a rock?

— 1 day ago with 11 notes
#fav  #science  #interesting 
therandominmyhead:

Yes just me, a dog. Taking a walk. With my dogs. Who are my friends. But also dogs. And I am a dog.

therandominmyhead:

Yes just me, a dog. Taking a walk. With my dogs. Who are my friends. But also dogs. And I am a dog.

(Source: twitter.com, via silverbit)

— 1 day ago with 60707 notes
Anonymous asked: Sand is mostly composed of quartz crystal. The atomic structure of quartz is held together by ionic and covalent bonds. Covalent bonds are stable at room temperature, so you would not be able to break the bonds unless you added heat.


Answer:

But What I’m saying is that they are held together by bonds.  But you can break those bonds.  In this case, Quartz is a rock also, and can have their bonds broken and crushed into sand.  The sand does not form bonds until heat is added, it is liquefied and reformed.  


If we keep crushing quartz a lot, it shouldn’t have bonds, and should act like a liquid? 

— 1 day ago with 1 note
#Anonymous 

I’m just really really really really really really really really really really Introverted, and I like to be by myself a lot.  In fact I don’t really like talking to people too much.  I like people, I’m not even shy.

— 1 day ago with 6 notes
#me  #about  #about me  #personal 
Anonymous asked: About your question regarding sand, sand is considered a sedimentary rock. I think you were talking about manipulating in a lab, but from what I've learned in geology after sedimentary rock layers build up the older layers can undergo metamorphic changes or even be melted by an magma intrusion beneath the surface. So I feel like if sand became a liquid, it might not actually be sand anymore, but would undergo chemical changes in it's composition. I hope this helps, or I could be totally off.


Answer:

Yeah, No…That doesn’t answer my question.  Although interesting. 

My assumption is that if you grand a particle infinitesimally then it wouldn’t have any strong bond forces, so they wouldn’t form any technical bonds.  So I assume that it should be a liquid at room temperature.  Much how like water has no actual bonds (hydrogen bond) just inter-molecular forces.

what I’m saying is if we physically destroy all the bonds…why doesn’t a solid act like a liquid. Yeah.

— 1 day ago
#Anonymous 

The harder you work, the easier your life is. 

— 2 days ago with 10 notes
#thoughts 

I’ve started a philosophy blog cause I can’t stop thinking. Haha.

— 2 days ago with 6 notes
#I now have 4 side blogs  #personal 

acid-puunk:

Abandoned power station, Fremantle

(via aseaofshells)

— 2 days ago with 700 notes
#yes 
— 2 days ago with 230220 notes